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Bionutrition Today sponsored by Lebanon

How customers spread out payments determines how many times you’ll be on their lawn.

Brian Horn | May 6, 2013

There are two ways to get the most out of organic lawn care. Customers can pay a larger upfront cost, which would result in less maintenance over time, or they can spend less in the beginning and spend on more consistent treatments.

“If we take a lawn and there is an upfront investment to get rid of some of the grasses they have to plant some turf type tall fescue which is going to need less fertilizer, water, everything, we would do less services,” says Alec McClennan, owner of Good Nature Lawn Care.

“If the client is adventurous, they can include microclover. You mix tall fescue and microclover together. It’s a lawn that basically fertilizes itself. We do two or three applications a year and it’s a lot less expensive than using the chemicals, but there is an upfront investment there.”

McClennan says, for a 5,000 square-foot neighborhood lawn, a customer would see a five-year payback, if they paid more upfront. At Good Nature, payments can be spread out if a customer decides to pay more up front for a service. If you don’t put in the upfront costs, it would be about 20-30 percent more for ongoing costs, he says.

“You are coming out more often, feeding it a little more than you would if you were using grasses that didn’t need as much fertilizer,” he says.

No matter what the customer chooses, McClennan says you can make a living by mainly providing organic lawn care.

“If I was in this to get rich, I wouldn’t be in this,” he says. “But it’s possible to have a legitimate business that focuses on this. Sometimes, I think if I was doing a chemical lawn care company I would be five times the size, but then I’d feel a lot worse about it.”

 


 

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