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State pushes "green" lawn care for Bay

Industry News, Bionutrition Today sponsored by Lebanon

Officials urge homeowners to get a jump on fertilizer curbs due in 2013.

Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012

Maryland's law limiting lawn fertilizer practices doesn't kick in for more than a year yet, but state officials are urging homeowners to get a jump on the new curbs by limiting how much grass food they put down now.

At a press conference in Annapolis to kick off Earth Week, state Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance said there's no reason not to start using greener lawn and gardening practices at home this year. He said restoring the Chesapeake Bay needs homeowners to join farmers in taking care where, when and how they apply fertilizer.

Nutrients, mainly nitrogen and phosphorus, are key ingredients in lawn fertilizer, which accounts for about 44 percent of all fertilizer sold in Maryland. While farms have been subject to at least some regulation for a decade now, lawmakers adopted curbs last year on residential and business fertilizer practices to help meet the state's goals for reducing the nutrient pollution fouling the Chesapeake Bay.

The Fertilizer Use Act of 2011 doesn't become effective until Oct. 1, 2013, in large part to give lawn care companies time to meet the law's training and certification requirements. State agriculture officials said manufacturers of lawn fertilizer already have adjusted their products to reduce their nutrient content.

Under the law, lawn fertilizer formulas and application instructions will be changed to eliminate phosphorus altogether and to see that no more than 0.9 pounds of total nitrogen is applied for every 1,000 square feet of yard, with at least 20 percent of the nitrogen in slow-release form. Exceptions on the phosphorus ban will be made for specially labeled starter fertilizer and "organic" products.

The law also will prohibit fertilizer applications from Nov. 15 until March 1, within 15 feet of a water way or when heavy rain is forecast. Using fertilizer to de-ice sidewalks and driveways also is a no-no.

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