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Executing the plan

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Beary Landscaping took this project from design phase to portfolio winner.

Kristen Hampshire | February 16, 2012

A deep scope, tight schedule and village dynamics threw Beary Landscaping a slight learning curve ball during construction of a high-impact Frankfort, Ill., project. Mark McClure, sales manager, shares how the firm navigated through the process.

Stay on schedule. Creating a dreamscape in a tight space calls for a tight schedule. Logistics can make or break a project build on a small village lot, but Beary Landscaping met the challenge by communicating early and often. “Scheduling was rough,” McClure says. “Installations had to be done back-to-back, and we were working on top of each other.”

The main interference to the project schedule was delayed materials that were sourced from overseas, such as travertine that arrived four weeks late. “Variables that are out of our control are the hardest to deal with,” McClure says. Communication with stakeholders is critical: the customer, crew and other contractors on the job.

Consider a compromise. Neighbors were concerned about views into the homeowner’s property and that the amount of hardscaping being installed created some “cold” edges to the project. Planting large evergreens solved this problem. Plus, giving neighbors landscaping to screen the views won their long-term approval of the project. “There were some neighbors who didn’t like the views out of their windows into the backyard, and the homeowner also wanted some privacy,” McClure says. “So we came up with this idea (to give them evergreens), and the neighbors appreciated that.”

Take it to market.
This high-impact project is a portfolio winner for Beary Landscaping. Plus, the job inspired the company to implement an interactive portion of its website that will show projects-in-project. “So if anyone is thinking of doing a project, they can see all of the steps through real-life photos and a real-life timeline,” McClure says. Stay tuned for this tool.

 

This is one of three stories that appeared in Lawn & Landscape’s Business Builder e-newsletter. To continue reading about how Beary Landscaping pulled off this project:

Building history: When design approval takes a village, communication and compromise help keep a project moving along.

Winning acceptance:
Board approval isn’t easy when a design/build project breaks the norm. Here is how one firm eased a community’s concerns.


 

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