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Study: disease-resistant plants enhance profits, client satisfaction

Business Management

A University of Tennessee survey shows green industry professionals prefer disease- and insect-resistant plants – and make more money using them.

ScienceDaily | January 26, 2010

New varieties of plants marketed as "disease-resistant" or "insect-resistant" are becoming more accessible to consumers. Available through local garden centers and catalogues, these attractive ornamentals often come with guarantees that offer amateur gardeners the promise of lower maintenance or the need for fewer pesticides.

 
But how does this trend toward the increased use of disease- and insect-resistant plants impact the profits of landscape and lawn care professionals, whose incomes often rely on maintenance visits and pesticide applications in clients' gardens? 
 
To find what the experts think, William E. Klingeman from the University of Tennessee and colleagues at the University of Georgia surveyed lawn care and landscape maintenance professionals regarding the increased use of insect- and disease-resistant ornamental plants on grounds management, client satisfaction and profitability. The report appeared in a recent issue of the journal HortScience.
 
Completed surveys were received from lawn care and landscape professionals in Tennessee, Florida and Georgia. Data analyses revealed that respondents largely believe that insect- and disease-resistant plants will benefit their businesses and should result in increased client satisfaction. Less than 4 percent of respondents expressed concerns that their business would suffer if pest-resistant plants were made more available or used in greater numbers in clients' landscapes.
 
The professionals also indicated that they believe that 60 percent or more of the plants in a specific landscape would have to be resistant to insect pests or plant diseases to result in decreased company profits. Even if insect- and disease-resistant ornamental plants were used more widely in client landscapes, respondents expected that the required number of site visits to client landscapes would remain unchanged and that moderate reductions in insecticide and fungicide use would result. In short, the study proved that landscape management professionals accept and are willing to promote insect- and disease-resistant ornamental plants – good news for business and the environment.
 

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