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Maryland fertilizer law lowdown

Industry News

The legislation is designed to protect the Chesapeake Bay from excess nutrients.

| July 15, 2013

The Maryland fertilizer law will go into effect on Oct. 1. Below is a summary of some of the highlights.

Fertilizer Manufacturers and Distributors

Requires lawn fertilizer products sold in Maryland to include label directions to ensure that no more than 0.9 pound of total nitrogen is applied per 1,000 square feet; at least 20 percent of this nitrogen must be in a slow release form. The maximum amount of water soluble nitrogen in lawn fertilizer products applied per 1,000 square feet is capped at 0.7 pound. Effective October 1, 2013

Lawn Care Professionals

Training
University of Maryland Extension (UME) is developing a training manual to prepare individuals to take the certification exam. Training classes will be available in 2013.

Certification
Individuals and companies hired to apply fertilizers must be certified by MDA or work under the direct supervision of an individual who is certified. MDA will offer fertilizer applicator certification exams beginning fall 2013 and will publish a list of certified professional fertilizer applicators on its website.

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