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Imprelis damage still being investigated

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Dupont has established a hotline and website to report problems with the herbicide.

Lawn & Landscape Staff | July 28, 2011

Dupont Professional Products has created a hotline number to report any problems green industry professionals have experienced with the company’s Imprelis product.  

In a letter to turf management professionals, Michael McDermott, global business leader, DuPont Professional Products, said the hotline will go live on Monday and will be made available on the imprelis-facts.com website.
The hotline and website are in response to reports of, according to Dupont, injuries to Norway spruce and white pine trees in the Minnesota, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Wisconsin geographic band.

McDermott says in the letter that the company has engaged with 20 independent, certified arborist companies to work with anyone who has claimed damage from the product. The website will carry the latest information about Imprelis and reports of problems can be made there.

You can read the entire letter here.

The company released Imprelis in early spring, giving LCOs a low-volume option that by all accounts gave solid control of a wide range of weeds, including hard-to-eradicate species like ground ivy and wild violet.
Imprelis herbicide controls a wide range of broadleaf weeds with a new active ingredient – aptexor – and a new subclass of the carboxylic acid herbicides. The new AI allows LCOs to control weeds with much smaller applications of product: 4.5 fluid ounces (or 0.07 lbs.) per acre.

Since Memorial Day, applicators and university researchers in the Northeast and Midwest have been reporting curling needles, severe browning and dieback in trees near turf that had been treated with Imprelis.

Last month, university and state researchers from Michigan and Indiana described to Lawn & Landscape the symptoms they saw in evergreens, more specifically conifers, and mainly Norway spruce and white pine trees.

“On the spruces, what we see is the current year’s growth. So the newly emerging shoots will brown up or wilt, and then you sometimes get a twisting appearance to them,” said Bert Cregg, associate professor of horticulture and forestry at Michigan State University.

“Largely based on photos that have been sent to me, it’s almost the whole tree is affected. Some of the other things we see with spruces often are affecting individual branches, but this is a pretty uniform kind of damage to the tree.”

For Michigan State's guide to Imprelis-related injuries, click here.

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