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Industry seeks remedy for court-ordered permits

Association News

RISE presses Congress to end the duplicate permits pest control managers need under the Pesticide General Permit.

| November 4, 2011

WASHINGTON – RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment) continues to seek remedies to U.S. EPA's recently published Clean Water Act National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Pesticide General Permit. The national association contends the court-ordered pesticide permits are duplicative, extremely costly and jeopardize the ability of states, municipalities and landowners to protect public health and natural resources.

"We are disappointed that a legislative remedy to the court-ordered Pesticide General Permit (PGP) has so far been unworkable; however, we will continue outreach to Congress," said RISE President Aaron Hobbs. "Further, we will continue to work with EPA and the states as they now attempt to implement the permit EPA published on Oct. 31.

"As the PGP is implemented, it is important to remember this regulatory action was not considered necessary, nor was it sought by EPA,” Hobbs added. “EPA and the industries regulated under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act understand appropriate measures and protections for water are in place under the statute. As such, the PGP is not only unnecessary, but also duplicative and costly. At a time when states are cash strapped, the PGP and its enforcement will drain both government and small business resources with no gains in public health or water quality."


 

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