Wednesday, July 30, 2014

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Getting Goliath to hire David

Industry News

If you are a small landscaping company, there are hurdles to grabbing the big clients.

FOX Business | November 24, 2010

Whether you run a design firm, a PR agency or a landscaping business, if you’re a “small business,” there are barriers – perceived and real – to landing the big-name clients that will take you to the next level.

So why do big companies hire small firms?

Typically, because they are perceived to be cheaper, hungrier and more willing to run the engine past redline to please clients.

Paying the requisite dues to get into the country club is still a fact of life for many small firms, but under-bidding and over-delivering are not sustainable practices, especially for small firms.

In a world where reputation rules, how do you avoid the inevitable Catch-22 of needing the big- name experience to get the big-name experience?

First, you need to go after work that you want to do, and work that you can do well. But even if you’re ready for the big date, you need to get the invitation. Fundamentally, landing big clients is about trust. You don’t have to be big, or published in the journals, or have offices in Manhattan.

You have to be the best version of yourself, and you have to be persistent; here at Hornall Anderson, we have both succeed and failed in going after big name work.

Here are 10 tips for small businesses to landing those whales:

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